Posts tagged with ‘marine biopolymer’

  • Seaweed Extract – A Ray of Hope for Diabetics to Lead a Needle-free Life

    Diabetes sufferers now can lead a needle-free life, thanks to a breakthrough capsule made from seaweed extract. Japanese scientists have developed the novel seaweed capsule which they claim could help in providing relief to diabetic patients from the constant pain of needle pricks. The seaweed capsule is created by a team of scientists led by professor Amy Shen from the […]
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  • Mar. Drugs, Volume 13, Issue 6 (June 2015), Pages 3259-3991 Released

    MDPI us pleased to announce the publication of the following issue of Marine Drugs: Mar. Drugs, Volume 13, Issue 6 (June 2015), Pages 3259-3991   Table of Contents Special Issue Marine Peptides and Their Mimetics Article: Structural and Functional Characterization of a Novel α-Conotoxin Mr1.7 from Conus marmoreusTargeting Neuronal nAChR α3β2, α9α10 and α6/α3β2β3 Subtypes by Shuo Wang, Cong Zhao, Zhuguo Liu, Xuesong Wang, […]
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  • Clean water: A $16 solution using Chitosan?

    Could there be a $16 answer to the global challenge of clean drinking water? CNN’s Rachel Crane explains. More info
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  • FAO review highlights food and feed uses for fish and shellfish by-products

    By-products may constitute as much as 70% of fish and shellfish after industrial processing and much focus has been on converting these into commercial products. The aim of this paper is therefore to evaluate important challenges and to consider the most realistic options in the use of by-products. Certain by-products like heads, frames and off-cuts from filleting of fish may […]
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  • Tassal reels in $3.8m in federal funds for fish protein and oil facility

    TASSAL has reeled in a $3.85 million Federal Government grant towards a new $5 million fish protein and oil facility near Triabunna. The Tasmanian salmon producer today welcomed the grant, which will go towards the 20,000 tonne per annum fish byproduct processing plant. Justin O’Connor, Tassal’s head of engineering and risk, said the purpose-built facility would be located on farm land […]
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  • Researchers hope to turn shrimp shells into useful products

    University of Alabama chemist Robin Rogers imagines a future where shrimp shells could become more than a smelly seafood byproduct. “I believe in what I would call a chitin economy. I personally believe, if properly developed, the material you can develop from chitin and the markets you could sell them in would make the shrimp shell worth more than the […]
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  • Chitin from crustacean shells may hold key to preventing & treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBS)

    Yshimi Shibata, Ph.D., professor of biomedical science in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, has received a $380,552 grant from the National Institute of Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to further investigate how microparticles called “chitin” found in crab, shrimp and lobster shells have anti-inflammatory mechanisms that could lead […]
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  • Seaweed could be key to weight loss, study suggests

    Scientists at Newcastle University said a compound found in common seaweed would stop the body absorbing fat. Tests showed that alginate, found in sea kelp, can suppress the digestion of fat in the gut. The findings, published in the journal Food Chemistry, showed that a four-fold increase in one type of alginate boosted anti-fat absorption by 75%. More info
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  • Seafood waste a versatile tonic for crops

    The chitin-rich waste parts of seafood can bring a range of benefits to horticultural and agricultural crops, according to a review paper by former Moulton College research coordinator Dr Russell Sharp. “Chitin and its derivatives have been repeatedly shown to protect crops from pests, pathogens and physiological disorders,” he wrote in the paper, published in the journal Agronomy. More info
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  • Marine algae can help acne sufferers

    Scientists from the University of Stirling have discovered an unlikely treatment for acne – marine algae. Research by marine scientists at the University’s internationally renowned Institute of Aquaculture revealed the cleansing qualities of certain fatty acids including some produced by algae. They found these fatty acids prevent the growth of Propionibacterium acnes, a bacterium which causes the common skin condition. […]
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